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. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in in massachusetts and the url scott brown.com -- scott brown 2012 was very purchased. with so many women have been in washington are so many years as legislatures and working on porting work and yet their names never bubbled to the top were curious, why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? i mean, all three of you studied similar topics, but how did the book actually come about by >> your idea, ted. >> well, i guess it was my idea. i'd been a political nerd since i was, i don't know, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960s staging the nixon kennedy debate with our staff animals. and during all of this years of nerd am, what i was fascinated anywhere the magazine issues that would come out way in advance of the presidential election, that would previewed the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered and that simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues in so many magazines that women were not making it. they were not been thought to be
of the civil war when he finally retires. but he -- jacob brown, a few other officers, but scott is the most important. they become very much -- their agenda very much is to build a proper professional institution and take expertise, usually european, usually french, and bring it to the united states. so, another major figure of this would be astaire, who was sent on a mission to france, basically to collect information about military education. he collects huge numbers of books and material. comes back to west point, and with the support of people like scott -- scott becomes a permanent general during the war of 1812 -- he is able to systemize the west point curriculum and experience that been the had not been the case before. >> host: when was west point founded? >> guest: 1802. i think historians still argue about what thomas jefferson was really after when the school was founded. but no one disagrees the school is institutionally weak, unclear what the purpose of the institution is. there's not very systemized instruction. cadets are older, some younger, and to this day he is called the
. jerry brown's father was governor and he was a staunch supporter of clark kerr, and fbi officials relies as long as pat brown was governor, clark kerr would read as university of california president. so when ronald reagan was elected in november 1966, j. edgar hoover and other fbi officials do this as a breath of fresh it. they believe they finally had an out in the governor's mansion, and begin to work closely with ronald reagan to crackdown on student protesters and radical professors. >> so what happened? >> well, what the documents show that over the following years, well, what happened first is that one of the first things reagan does after he is elected is to phone the fbi request this briefing, which hoover personally authorizes. two wks later at fst board of regents meeting, attended by ronald reagan, the board of regents votes to fire clark kerr. the boards balance in power had shifted because reagan was nine-member and he made several appointments to it. one of the fbi documents that was released indicates that the board members were aware of certain fbi information that ronal
father had found the local baker's shop where they made thick gloves of heavy brown bread. he insisted on buying them. they tasted better which was to my mind nonsense. proper bread was white and free slice and tasted like almost nothing. that was the point. the driver of the police car opened the passenger door and told me to get in. my father rode up front beside the driver. the police car went slowly down the lane. the lane with unpaved, wide enough for one car at a time. apparently, precipitous, bumpy way, the whole thing rotted by farm equipment and time. these kids think is funny to drive a car and abandon its. i am glad it was found so fast. past the farm where a small girl with hair so blonde it was almost white with red cheeks stared as we went past. a piece of burnt toast on my lap. it is a long walk back to any where from here. we passed a band in the lane and saw the white mini over on the side in front of the gate being into a field with tires sunk deep in the ground. we drove past it on the grass verge. the policeman let me out and the three of us walked over to the many.
brown versus board of education and incredible struggle. tucson will be vindicated. program will be in because it's a mandate that tum pets state law. if you have a first amendment right to have your own text and crime line up and what is more important is it is egregious that we would deny the true history of arizona. i met this young student, and he said, jeff, you need to collect our stories. i want to be part of the history books too, one day, and not be left out. i need to know that we are part of the greater american experience and we have to stop the denial of contributions of the people who have been rooted here to all the 21 tribes, to the mexican-americans who have been here for centuries. we have to stop this dishonest wreckenning of the facts where we just throw numbers around, and the border and security and immigration, when, in true, we know that this is not true, but more importantly, we have to stop the sanctions of racial profiling. be it in our schools, in our streets, and now with sb1070. just think, last week, the nation could not believe it, that provis
. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts and the url scott brown dot -- scott brown twitchell.com was already purchased. but tommy women had been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work and yet their names never bubbled to the top. and we were curious why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? all three of you have done similar topics, but how did this book actually come about? >> your idea, ted. >> well, i guess it was my idea. i've been a political nerd since i was, you know, i don't, my parent's to remember my sister and i in 1960 staging a nixon-kennedy debate with our stuffed animals. my elephant beat her rabbit. and during all those years of nerd dumb, what always fascinated me were magazine issues that would come out way in advance of the presidential election that would preview the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered, and it simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues and so many magazines that women were not making it onto that list. they were not being thought to be pres
. >> first one he's in his office in april of 1987 and he was having a meeting with brown, former defense secretary for jimmy carter and just going over parts of his program. i think brown was an informal advisor to his campaign, we're in his house office and i was just siting in -- sitting in a chair while this discussion was going on. i was listening to howard brown. >> the other one. >> this is what i call the dead tired at 5:00 p.m. shot. it's live at 5 in boston and it's that whole look of being wired up to the electronic media, getting a free spot on the news, and spelling it is what you want to tell but looking -- just waiting to go on for the green light to go on, the cameras, and he has that zombie expression on his face. >> >> and these two. >> this was in a factory in new hampshire. where he was listening to a factory worker and seemed to be impatient with it and the last photograph was taken after the faneuil hall debate. we had driven that evening from boston up to manchester in a blizzard and everybody decided, the reporters and can't date, to -- candidate to go down to the
, robert duncan, cecil brown, jack spicer. my teacher was a student here and his teacher was josephine miles. i would be remiss if i did not acknowledge the continuing presence of ishmael reed, maxine pinkston, still among us and i must say to you that it is a pleasure and i have talked to the number of places where that term pleasure does not apply. [laughter] it is a pleasure to teach here with bob has and jeffrey, vikram chandra, tom farber but it's my students that have brought me great joy over these last several -- last five years in my teaching here. they read the assignments. [laughter] and then they show up in the office aching for commerce nation, which is just incredibly gratifying and it makes me work harder but that's okay. they graduate and they go out and they start galleries and began reading series. they take place in the world and they keep things going, so welcome here to this room this afternoon. thank you. [applause] >> i want to introduce a dynamic young man. this organization has gotten new blood but it's a good idea to keep some of the old blood around. [laugh
been a big contributor to ed monday browne, helping browne to defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon remembered that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was a fellow named george romney. who's son mitt has been in the news lately. mitt's day complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seemed to think he could run it any way saw he fit. there was talk that ray may have used fannie mae postage or letter head to raise money for the democratic candidates. and the white house was gets complaints from the republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related to foreclosures. all the fees. within nine months nixon fired him as fannie mae without giving any public explanation. he resisted. he full min nate to the press that nixon was turning fannie mae in to a patronage put pudding. he tried to get a restraining order from the federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. ray kept showing up for work anyway. at one
had been a big contributor to edmund brown. helping brown defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon still remember that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing sector was a fellow named george romney whose son mitt romney has been in the news lately. his dad complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seem to think he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might use fannie mae postage or letterhead to raise money for democratic candidates. the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related foreclosures, all those fees. well, within nine months of taking office, nixon fired ray lapin as president of fannie mae without giving any public explanation. ray lapin resisted. he fulminated to the press nixon western fannie mae into what he called a patronage putting. try to try to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't bu
, robert tonkin, cecil brown, jack spicer. my teacher, archie and thence was a teacher here in his teacher was josephine miles. i'd be remiss if i did not acknowledge the continuing presence of someone, maxed in kingston still among us. and i must say to you that it's a pleasure and i've taught a number of places with the term pleasure does not apply. [laughter] it is a pleasure to teach your with linda jini, brunning mukherjee, the term chandra, tom faulkner, but it's my students that brought us great joy over these last five years and a teaching here. they read the assignments. and they showed up in the office or conversation. and they work harder. they begun reading series, tape lace in the world and keep things going. bagram here to discern this afternoon. thank you. [applause] >> i want to assure you is -- introduce a dynamic young man. it's a good idea to keep some of the old water out and our chairperson is just an imam, the great playwright ali. this young man and had the new culture. as a major. at 2:00 in the morning that was the kind of dogged pursuit waking people up at 2:00 in
in the brown versus board of education in 1964. he was the recordholder to this day of the longest one-man filibuster. twenty-four hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember him as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was one of those. what we forget about him is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? well, it is the major story in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs and industries and resources and populations from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in a personal period. southern states were recruiting industries and the right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government at a time when the united states was involved in a cold war with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt domi
the bill that cuts would has browned potatoes and onions because i have never tasted before. honored departure she wrote a letter to ronald reagan describing the time she had spent in america doing what she liked best, looking at beautiful thoroughbreds and walking in the wide-open spaces by the absence. the american west had a long held a fascination for the queen. one of her most intriguing american friends has been a monty roberts, a california cowboy who is known as the horse whisperer for his humane techniques to train horses in a circular pen. she was so impressed by what she had read about his approach that she invited him to demonstrate his technique at windsor castle in 1989. come show me this lion's cage of yours, she said. do i need a whip and change? as montae recalled to me, said that not only with the twinkle but that her message addressing him clearly her talent put him at ease. his demonstration was a big success, and the queen and the cowboys struck up a fast. over lunch in the castle garden she asked him numerous questions i saw mine open up, he recalled. when he to
and smarter people are. you don't have to move manufacturing to the lowest cost labor or moves to brown sites, or waste lands, but to where people live, have ideas, and have needs. it's a short r supply chain, just in time manufacturing, contact between the way things are made and consumed. it's a better ecological footprint. >> yeah. time for a last question, and i know whenever you open questions up, it's the power of the interpret and distributed anything, you have a whacky question. >> decide to end on that? >> if you don't mind. i like it a lot. i love to see this scenario. software tools on earth used by people to design cool stuff, #*d # printers on the moon, using local material, how realistic is it, and what stuff would be produced up there? >> that's star trek replicators. what you have, and member, there's a box. the box has, like, presumably feed stock of various sorts. i don't know if they were atoms or molecules. >> never specified. >> viles and goo that you say you want something, and it would just download the recipe, mix them in the right proportions, fab fabricate them in th
to the rest of her mother's papers into helping brown's papers and i corresponded with her by e-mail and masse to do an interview and said he said everything in the book and unless i have a specific question that she really didn't want to see and to be a cynic could not contact. >> could you expand a little more on the first lady's domestic agenda -- [inaudible] >> and she became first lady a difficult time. she had an agenda. her first as volunteerism, although she's very interested in reading. a volunteerism is something very dear to her because she did very much believe in people helping other people. you have to remember 1969 the country was in tremendous turmoil says something like volunteerism is not going to be a cause that would catch on with the general public. she also did run into obstacles of a very tense situation between the west wing in a string. she did run into issues in terms of being able to explore and find herself. she did have other things domestically although jackie kennedy gets a tremendous amount or redecorating the white house and actually pat did more of that. she h
manufacturing to the lowest cost of labor or brown sites in the middle of industrial waste land. you can move manufacturing to where people live and where they have ideas and needs. is a shorter supply chain, more sustainable manufacturing, just-in-time manufacturing, contact between the way things are made and consumed, a fundamentally healthy model. >> we have time for one last question. i know whenever you open questions up, the power of the internet and distributed anything, you get one really wacky question. i thought we would end on that. i would love to see this scenario. software tools honors used by people design cool stuff and 3d printers on the moon which produce that using local materials. how realistic is this and what's the food you see produce up there? >> that is the star trek replicated. that is where what you have in that model, there is a box. the box has so many feedstocks. whether their atoms or molecules, imagine piles of goo that you would say you want something, it would just download the recipe, it would mix them in the right proportions and fabricate them in the righ
manifesto which is the protest of the supreme court decision in the brown versus board of education system of 1954. strom thurmond is the record holder on this one man filibuster 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. remember him as one of the dead by dogs and he was, he was one of the last demagogue's but what we forget a lot one of the first of the sun will conservative. and now the sun belt one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics and that is the flow of jobs come industries, resources as the states from the northeast and midwest and the south and the southwest in the post world war ii period. southern states were recording industry is passing the right to
in the brown v. board of education 1964. strom thurmond is the recordholder to stay at the longest one-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population an
factors, global population growth of over 7 million. how would you factor such as lester brown, who is a fight of the worldwide institute and wrote world on the edge, he was concerned that we aren't taking these factors into account, especially the ability of the land is being degraded, the water is being degraded, and the inability of agricultural innovation to be able to feed? he argues destabilization. would you comment on where -- is he totally out to lunch in your view, or are these factors really important in looking at the overall equation you are putting forward? >> i think it's a very important issue that you have raised. and it magnifies the challenges that we have before us. you know, i think that, that we have become somewhat complacent about order and about relations among great powers. and we have assumed that the real challenges of our time come from yemen, iraq, libya. but i worry that history is picking up again, and that competition over water, over oil, over natural gas, over at arable land is going to get more and more intense. as india and china continue to indu
that when a male is elected to senatorship, immediately this, a future presidential hopeful. scott brown had not since warning yet in massachusetts. and so many have been in washington for 7 years. and we were curious why not. >> how did you decide to write this book. how did this book come about. i had been a political nerd since i was -- staging a
mother's papers into helene browne's papers. i corresponded with her by e-mail and asked if she would be willing to do an interview. she said she'd said everything she wanted to say in her book unless you have a specific question that she really didn't want to be interviewed and i could not contact her sister. >> hi, mary. could you expand on the first lady's domestic agenda and why you think it didn't spark? >> she became first lady of difficult time. she had agenda. her first cause was volunteerism. although she was also very interested in reading and volunteerism is something very dear to it because she didn't very much believe in people helping other people. but you have to remember in 1969 the countries and tremendous turmoil and says something like volunteerism was not going to be a cause that would catch on with the general public. she also ran into obstacles, a very tense situation between the west wing any swing and she did run into issues in terms of being able to explore and find herself. she did have a good thing she domestically although jackie kennedy gets a tremendous a
's the publisher of little brown who is tom wolfe's publisher. if he'll stand, i would hope he could be recognized. mike? there he is. thank you, michael. [applause] >> welcome. >> thank you. and our sponsor, one of the really great sponsors that we've had for many, many years, they've been really huge supporters of the miami book fair, and that's wpbt, channel 2. and to get our program off the ground, i want to bring out the executive vice president and chief operating officer, delaware hour race sukdeo please, please, welcome her. thank you all. >> have a good evening. [applause] >> thank you, everyone, and welcome. my name is delores, i'm the coo for wpbt-2 which is your public television station. [applause] now, what i love about the miami book fair is that for me it represents how we should be known here in miami. sure, we have beautiful beaches, we've got some interesting politics. i think increasingly we'll be known for our wacky characters. but if you look to the person to your right and if you speak to the person to your left, what you will find are engaged, informed, cultured citizens an
had spent considerable time contemplating the brown wastes around the infantry base depot. and to his continual amazement, being a man who had always thought trees and lakes and mountains important, he loved them. possibly it was their geometric barrenness. perhaps in may when conditions were drier and hotter he would not have loved them so well, the lone and level sands stretching far away. he remembered shelley's traveler from an antique land which could certainly have been egypt. there, as they neared cairo, were the three great pyramids punctuating the perfect line of the horizon like an ancient geometry lesson. still, for all its flatness, the greenness of the delta would have been -- if he could be allowed for a moment to consider the unthinkable -- an unbelievably sight to the africa corps should they ever see it. this is a good war out here in that respect he wrote home a few days later. he has a lush, green land as goal, and we have our goal; ever west which is the direction of home and the traditional american direction. he had been looking forward for a while now to spendin
. meanwhile, there's going to be a lot of suffering. >> h. rapp brown. >> burn, baby, burn. >> they didn't think to say -- it's a little narrower than that. we've now been almost five years into this crisis, and different economic ideas have -- people have made predicts. people have said not so much the numbers on gdp but how things would... >> there's one aspect of pics at the blog a little bit earlier it is more flexible wages, no unions. the economy is going to perform better. and the countries in which the stronger union and better job protection done better in responding to the crisis. the best country in terms of labor market. what's interesting from the point of view of economics, economic theory is this crisis has been wonderful. doing that to test it processes. it's shutting a lot of light on a lot of different issues at a good cause to a lot of people in a lot of these countries. >> this is the question addressed to both of you. what is your view on the standardization dear subject to it, expected utility in economics? does it describe reality? especially considering experience
flushed eyes, in my face. all this is chalk white skin and brown-dried blood from head to toe. kermit's skin was blue after they finally found him and put him in the box. did jeff have any skin left to show his mother? i run every day along the river stretching to my left, occasionally veiled by low trees swaying in the sunshine and the light breeze off the water. my left knee started aching 5 miles ago. my teeth are rotting out of my head. my left eye twitches. the detonation rains concrete chunks on my head, peppers the armored truck with molten steel. i reach for my rifle. i run down the road outside my home to the drone of humvee diesel engines and in the purple sunrise over a flat desert. the crazy in my chest is full to bursting, but the protest of my overworked lungs and heart tamps it down. the run makes the rest of the body scream louder, one din to cover another. the foot sits in a box because, why not? where else would you put it? i run, and i don't want to stop. the adrenaline has been building all day, and it finally has a release. the boilover flows. fidgety legs and swe
? [laughter] >> guest: contact little brown. jfk at the middle schools. >> i work in a library. >> guest: at the school of the arts i saw their holiday concert and it was mind-boggling. we will do it at the kravis center this year and we paid to have it there. it will be spectacular. >> in the book middle school. >> guest: it is a test. [laughter] >> guest: you have to win the kid t-shirt. >> why do they have to be dead? >> this is hard to imagine that not everybody in the room has read the book yet. i don't want to give away stuff probably be at the book signing? we will talk about a privately. >> >> host: do not give away what happens in the book carlos strangle you. >> when did you write your first book and what was it? >> i published at 26. 10 years ago i was very lucky. i was turned down by 31 publishers then it won the best mystery. thank you. >> are you telling the ending again? [laughter] we will talk. you and me. >> we have a journalist or a white house correspondent. [applause] >> this is my girlfriends question but she is shy. would this the process of getting a story publish
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)